Self-Assessment

Stress comes in all sorts of shapes and sizes, differs for each of us, we all respond to stress in diverse ways, acute and chronic stress have different effects, and the separation between them is often blurred. These and demographic influences make it difficult for scientists to agree on a definition of stress, much less measure it. There are hundreds of stress questionnaires, ranging from the Social Readjustment Rating Scale for periodic major life change events published by Holmes and Rahe over 40 years ago (with numerous revisions since then), to the Daily Hassles Scale that lists minor annoyances like fights with customers and family or being stuck in traffic that can occur several times a day. Others, like the Perceived Stress Scale and Profile of Mood States, assess the effects of stress or are designed specifically for job stress, women, children, teenagers, the elderly, Type A behavior, depression, anger, anxiety etc. Many researchers and others have constructed stress quizzes, some of which are self-serving and very few if any have been validated, so their value is questionable.

These assessments are a public service brought to you by The American Institute of Stress. 

Feeling stressed? The place to start is to find out how stressed you are and more importantly, how you are effected by stress. The American Institute of Stress teamed up with Stressmaster International to offer a scientifically validated psychometric test called the Stress Mastery Questionnaire (SMQ). It formally sold for $75.00, but by special arrangement with this Institute it is now only $17.95 at Stress.org and AIS members can check it out for free. This confidential, online self-assessment test offers you analyses and personalized feedback on all your stress risk scores in the form of a 9 page Detailed Stress Report followed by a 66 page Stress Mastery Guide and Workbook. Using 87 psychometrically created questions, the SMQ provides a way to view your personal stress in 3 key areas with 11 unique scales.

Then you will receive the Stress Mastery Guide and Workbook educating you about the SMQ test results and what you can do about it to lead a less stressed, more enjoyable life. If you only do one thing to improve the quality of your life this year, make it this.

STRESS WARNING SIGNS
Hostility/Anger
Time Urgency
Perfectionism
Disappointment
Burnout
Under-Achievement
Tension

STRESS EFFECTS
Physical Stress Effects
Life/Work Satisfaction

STRESSORS
Life Events
Hassles

Workplace Stress Survey

The AIS Workplace Stress Survey was developed to serve as a simple screening measure to determine the need for further investigation with more comprehensive assessments. *This survey is not validated.

Holmes-Rahe Life Stress Inventory

AIS Fellow Dr. Richard Rahe has granted us permission to post his Holmes-Rahe Stress Inventory.